THE LABORATORY, GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY

Posted on: August 7, 2016 by in Uncategorized
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THE LABORATORY, GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY

 

NOTES FROM THE LABORATORY, GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY.” A NEW METHOD OF DEVELOPING “ GUM ” PRINTS. By C. S. Ferguson. I BELIEVE the usual method for developing prints by the gumbichromate process, particularly when it is tlesired to emphasize certain features, is to gently abrase the part intended to be accentuated by means of a camel’s hair brush. This procedure, as is well kno\\n, is likely to remove entire]) the delicate film of gum unless estreme caution is exercised coupled with considerable manipulative skill. I have found, I believe, a new technic lvhich reduces manipulative skill to a minimum and which, at the same time, allo~vs of local development to any desired degree \vithout showing any obvious local treatment. The print is first soaked in warm water. It is then supported against a piece of stout cardboard, as an easel, and sprayed with warm I\-ater from an atomizer. 11~ having an ordinary photograph as a guide, one can so control the develol~nient of the iniaye as to meet one’s standard of art. * Cofnmu~~icated by the Director. The “ Pipeless” Furnace. ~~NOK. (Mcfal ll’orkrr, Plztnrhcr md Strn~~ Fitter, vol. xci, No. 19, p. 519, May 9, 1919.)-The socalled “ Pipeless ” furnace, by which the heating of an entire dwelling is effected through only one outlet on the first floor immediately above the furnace, has come into extended use \zithin recent years. The very satisfactory results of the one-pipe apparatus are due to a double cased furnace with a duplex register face for the entrance of cool air as well as for the discharge of heated air. Equally good results can be obtained from the samcb furnace with the old style casing and independent registers and ducts for warm and return air supplies. The success of any warm-air heating apparatus depends on the proper circulation of the air in the space warmed. If the air in such space is not moved or replaced, there will be no warm air flolving from the registers. While there arc very many apparX’J 7.50 CURRENT TOPICS. [J. F. I. ently successful furnace plants, their economy is below par, This fact is demonstrated when a return air supply is installed. The return air system practically accomplishes exactly what the “ pipeless ” does. Such a condition is often found and disposes of the usual argument for more cold air. It also proves that some means must be provided for properly circulating the air to secure satisfactorily warm air plants. The temperature at the register face of the one-pipe furnace is considerably higher than the ordinary register, and the velocity of the entering air is greater than from the common form of warmair pipe. The high temperature and velocity combine to make the heating of almost any open or connected space a simple, quick and positive operation. Rooms on the second floor will be warmed so long as the doors are kept open, although distant rooms will suffer unless they open from a general hallway. The “ pipeless ” furnace supplies a need that has long existed for a simple and economical method of heating that does away with the objection of stoves, but it does not replace the desirable qualities of a good warm-air plant, properly piped and supplied with air, both from the house and from out of doors. Department Store Testing Laboratory. ANON. (Dry Goods Equipment Through Philadelphia Public Ledycr, May 9, IgIg.)- What is probably the first research laboratory to be put in by any department store in the United States has been installed recently by the Bannon Brothers Company, St. Paul, Minn. This laboratory, completely equipped, and on the main floor in the textile department, actually makes practical and chemical tests of the textiles, food products, linoleums and other goods carried by the store. This has two advantages-it enables the buyers to know that the goods they buy are up to specifications xvith respect to quality, materials, and freedom from adulteration, and it enables the store to advertise its goods under a ‘quality guarantee, backed by the evidence of its own laboratory. The research laboratory consists of a glass-inclosed room, fitted out with the usual chemical laboratory equipment and in addition with special equipment for the testing of textiles and other products. The staff includes a trained chemist and two assistants. who make analyses of goods. Both microscopical and chemical tests are used. For accurate work in analyzing cloths the chemical test is necessary, but quick determinations that give approximate values can easily be made with a microscope. The object of the laboratory is honesty in merchandising. The customer’s interests are protected by checking and analyzing goods to see that they are as they are represented and that no misleading statements are made, especially in the papers. X t-st is made of every article advertised so that it can be truthfully presented as “ pure silk ” or “ 89 per cent. wool ” with the backing of an actual test in the store’s own laboratory.